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Trumpet in the New Year

Naples Philharmonic Masterworks

Hayes Hall

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Trumpet in the New Year

Naples Philharmonic Masterworks


Rossen Milanov, conductor
Tine Thing Helseth, trumpet

   Copland — Appalachian Spring
   Haydn — Trumpet Concerto
   Bartók — The Miraculous Mandarin Suite
   Falla — The Three Cornered Hat Suite


The Naples Philharmonic begins the new year with dance-inspired music and a burst of glorious brass, led by guest conductor Rossen Milanov.

Although Haydn wrote 108 symphonies, 68 string quartets, and 47 piano sonatas, he wrote very few concertos—two for cello, a concerto each for violin and piano, and one of the greatest showpieces for classical trumpet ever written. His trumpet concerto, composed the same year at his great oratorio Creation, is unusually showy and brilliant for Haydn.  It is also notoriously difficult to play. Wynton Marsalis compared playing the piece to scaling a Himalayan mountain. Brilliant young trumpeter Tine Thing Helseth is guest soloist.

The trumpet also plays a key role in the evening’s first piece, Aaron Copland’s Appalachian Spring. The instrument opens the famous melody line in Simple Gifts providing a herald to the most beloved part of this work. Written for a Martha Graham ballet, and without any thoughts of Appalachia, the work is one of the seminal pieces of American orchestral music, creating a musical equivalent of the country’s sweeping landscape.

Two other dance works make up the second half of the program. The ballet that accompanied Bartók’s The Miraculous Mandarin suite was banned on moral grounds after its premiere in Cologne in 1926. Full of intricate orchestration, the dramatic music often sends the musicians careening down breathtaking paths. A thundering timpani wave opens Falla’s The Three-Cornered Hat suite, which was commissioned by Russian ballet impresario Sergei Diaghilev with costumes and sets created by Pablo Picasso. The story of lust for another man’s wife, the music is full of references to Andalusian folk music and, at one point, Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony.

Rossen Milanov

Rossen Milanov


Bulgarian-born conductor Rossen Mianov is the Music Director Designate of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra. He is also the Music Director of the Princeton Symphony and Principal Conductor of the Orquesta Sinfónica del Principado de Asturias (OSPA) in Spain as well as the Music Director of the nationally recognized training orchestra Symphony in C in New Jersey.

Rossen has established himself as a conductor with a considerable national and international presence. His recent conducting highlights include debuts at the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Sapporo Symphony and Tokyo City Philharmonic and returns to the Milwaukee ,Vancouver, Fort Worth, Aalborg and Latvian National Symphony Orchestras; National Symphony Orchestra at the Kennedy Center, Zurich Opera, Hyogo Performing Arts Center Orchestra and his Link Up education projects with Carnegie Hall and the Orchestra of St. Luke’s. This season, Rossen debuts with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Toronto Symphony Orchestra, Opera Oviedo in Spain, Hungarian National Orchestra, Orchestre Philharmonique de Strasbourg, New York City Ballet, Pacific Symphony and returns to the National Symphony Orchestra in Washington, KwaZulu-Natal Philharmonic in South Africa, Aalborg Symphony and conducts the Curtis Symphony Orchestra in Verizon Hall in Philadelphia.

Rossen studied conducting at the Curtis Institute of Music and the Juilliard School, where he received the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship. He studied oboe and orchestral conducting at the Bulgarian National Academy of Music, and holds a Masters degree in oboe performance from Duquesne University. As the former Chief Conductor of the Bulgarian National Radio Orchestra (2003-08) and Music Director of the New Symphony Orchestra, Sofia (1997-2013), he received the Bulgarian Ministry’s Award for Extraordinary Contribution to Bulgarian Culture. He was named Bulgaria’s Musician of the Year in 2005, he was among the top 100 most influential people in New Jersey in 2014 and won an ASCAP award in 2011 for his programming with Princeton Symphony Orchestra.

Tine Thing Helseth

Tine Thing Helseth


At only 27, trumpet soloist Tine Thing Helseth is becoming one of the most sought after classical trumpet players in the world.  With five recordings under her belt already, Tine was named a “superstar of tomorrow” by BBC Music Magazine.  In only her fifth United States performance, she will play Haydn’s monumental trumpet concerto with the Naples Philharmonic.

In addition to her solo work, Tine is the founder of tenThing, an all-female brass ensemble that takes on both classical brass pieces and transcribes other famous works for brass.

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